Saturday, September 26, 2009

pastel book added to book list













32. On Location by Richard McDaniel (click for his website)

(Stayed up late reading and then got up early the next morning to finish this excellent book!)

In college my classes focused on film and sculpture, so I didn't get to have formalized training in many other mediums. If it wasn't for the cost, I would of gladly kept going to school. There are so many art forms and techniques that I want to explore. With the Internet and the library I can learn other mediums that I have been very eager to learn, like pastels.

With an upcoming lesson that I am teaching on pastels, reading On Location has given me confidence, knowledge and added even more to my excitement of this medium. Through Richard McDaniel's book, he reinforced the techniques that I learned in college drawing and color theory classes and private instruction on oil and charcoal drawing. This book is stunning in the simplicity and clarity of what to ask yourself while you are creating and demystifying various pastel techniques.

For me a book's layout is just as important as the content. I have many art books that I adore the images and glean inspiration from, but the text is flawed in some manner. Sometimes just being too wordy deters me from reading what the artist has to say. On Location has a clean layout, informative captions and equally helpful text. Reading the book gave me lots of ahh! moments that gave me insight on how a pastelist works and lots of other reminders of what I had learned in previous art classes that also apply to drawing with pastels.










McDaniel paints plein air, which is painting on location.








The layering of colors adds lots of texture and interest. The color also evokes the emotion that I experienced when I visited Stonehenge.

To read about the other 32 books that I've read this year, click here.

1 comment:

  1. I totally agree with you. When I read books or magazines on architecture and design, the wordiness sometimes takes away from the point the writer is trying to make.

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